Explore Opportunities for Undergraduate Research in the Arts and Humanities

Tuesday, February 24 | 5:30 p.m. | Bartlett Center 109

Free and Open to All OSU Students

Featuring a panel of OSU faculty, who will demonstrate the diversity of opportunities for research in the arts and humanities.

Topics include:

Applying for a Wentz Research Grant | Eligibility, guidelines, deadlines, etc.

Each year, $4,500 one-year Wentz Research Grants are given to approximately forty undergraduates in addition to several $750 Wentz Semester Grants to conduct independent research with the guidance of a faculty mentor in any field of study (major)

Finding a Faculty Mentor | Communicating with faculty, choosing a topic, etc.

Identifying a faculty mentor is often the first and most challenging step in developing a research project. Learn strategies for finding a mentor and making first contact.

Writing a Research Proposal | Keys to developing an effective proposal, etc.

Effective research proposals share similar features; learn what they are and how to write your own proposal.

Click Here to Download the Event Flyer

Event Hosted by the Art History Organization and The History Club.

The Deadline to Apply for the 2015 Cowboys in Cambridge Program is This Friday, Jan. 30

The Henry Bellmon Office of Scholar Development and Undergraduate Research invites undergraduates in all majors to apply for the 2015 Cowboys in Cambridge program:

Discovering Dickens’s England: Travels with the Nicklebys
Taught by Dr. Jeffrey Walker, Professor of English
Cambridge, UK | July 5-18, 2015 | ENGL 4400 – H Designation

In July 2015, the Henry Bellmon Office of Scholar Development and Undergraduate Research’s “Cowboys in Cambridge” program will celebrate its 12th anniversary at Magdalene College, University of Cambridge.  The program involves two weeks of study on a course prepared by OSU’s top faculty, with completion of the course project in mid-October for fall semester honors (if applicable) or general credit (3 hours).  The program is popular with OSU’s outstanding students and known for its exceptional academic benefits at a remarkably low cost.  All successful applicants will attend a thorough travel orientation pre-departure and be assigned texts for study in May and June to prepare for this experience.  This year’s trip will include a two-day bus tour into northern England and a class visit to London.

2015 Course Information

The first of nineteen monthly installments of Charles Dickens’s widely popular The Life and Adventures of Nicholas Nickleby appeared on 2 April 1838 (the year of Queen Victoria’s coronation) and sold for one shilling.  Wrapped in an attractive paper cover and bound with advertisements for everything from new books and telescopes to false teeth and miracle pills, each affordable installment contained two detailed illustrations by Phiz and the next episode in the Nicklebys’ captivating adventures.  The first installment sold 50,000 copies, and the growing popularity of each subsequent number, shared and shaped by the audience who read it, led to incredible success for Dickens, who delivered the final installment a year and a half later.

In this course you will read and respond to Nickleby as did its 19th-century readers and follow in the footsteps of its hero with trips to the countryside Dales where he discovers firsthand the horrors of Yorkshire boarding schools and to London where he works to blunt the poverty, class pretensions, and legal machinations of his money-laundering uncle. Dramatic readings with a stage adaptation of a scene from the novel by the class highlight the fortnight’s entertainment—one chiefly designed to address the comic novel, the Dickensian fascination with the world of the theater, the role of the book in Victorian society, and the way readers responded to the novel in serial and helped shape what happened next.  By reading Nickleby, part by part, you may find yourself weaving the world of fiction into your own real world as did the novel’s contemporary readers. For as the novel and its characters progressed over a year and a half, so, too, did the reader’s life progress.  Readers frequently saw the change and growth in their life through the lens of the fictional character’s development, blurring the lines between literature and life.

Undergraduates in all majors are encouraged to apply for this unique course, which is designed to help students not only enjoy Nicholas Nickleby, one of literature’s greatest comic novels, but also investigate the educational, legal, political, economic, social, and historical problems that beset Dickens’s England in the 1830s—problems that continue to exist here and everywhere almost two centuries later.  Successful applicants will participate in a thorough orientation and be assigned readings for study in May and June to prepare for a journey through Dickens’s England.

Readings include Charles Dickens’s novel Nicholas Nickleby (Penguin), Robert Douglas-Fairhurst’s biography Becoming Dickens: The Invention of a Novelist (Harvard), and a package of secondary readings on education, law, economics, melodrama, and iconography in the Victorian age, as well as discussions of how readers respond to what they read.

2015 Course Costs and Scholarship Support

The actual program fee is $3,600, however, all students accepted will receive substantial scholarship support ($1,500) bringing the cost down to $2,100.  An additional scholarship of up to $500 may be available to students requesting it by submitting an optional short essay describing exceptional financial need.  Further, the OSU Office of Study Abroad has additional scholarships that students may apply for.  The cost INCLUDES 3 OSU credit hours, guest lecturers, single room and board (free breakfast daily), a formal dinner in one of Cambridge’s ancient colleges, a group photograph outside the Pepys Library at Magdalene College, a two-day bus excursion to northern England, transportation and admission to Castle Howard, a one-day bus excursion to London with admission to the Dickens Museum and the Foundling Museum, and tickets to an outdoor Shakespeare play in Cambridge.  Note that all items are subject to change.

The cost EXCLUDES travel expenses to Cambridge, miscellaneous personal expenses, and any costs associated with travel before or after the course.  Scholarship support is made possible by The Lew Wentz Foundation and The Henry Bellmon Office of Scholar Development and Undergraduate Research’s Cowboys Scholars Society.  All tuition and applicable program fees, along with the scholarship support you receive, will appear on your Bursar account at the beginning of the fall semester in August 2015.  No OSU tuition waivers are usable for this course.  Note:  May 1, 2015 is the deadline to drop this course with no financial penalty.  After that date, you will be responsible for all the course costs, including tuition, even though it will not appear on your Bursar account until August.

Download the 2015 “Cowboys in Cambridge” Info. Sheet/Application
Deadline: Jan. 30, 2015

The Deadline to Apply for Scholar Abroad – Trinidad and Tobago is This Friday, Jan. 30

The Henry Bellmon Office of Scholar Development and Undergraduate Research invites undergraduates in all majors to apply for the 2015 “Scholar Abroad” Program:

Island Life: A Literary and Cultural Survey of the Caribbean
Taught by Dr. Richard Frohock, Professor of English
Trinidad and Tobago | June 1-12, 2015 | ENGL 4400 – H and I Designations

International experience gives students a global perspective and a competitive edge to win prestigious scholarships, secure prominent jobs, and gain admission to top graduate programs. Participants will attend thorough pre-departure travel orientations and be assigned texts to prepare for this experience. Leading this program is OSU Professor and Head of the English Department, Dr. Richard Frohock, who specializes in Early American and Early Caribbean Studies, in collaboration with Tim O’Neil, OSU Undergraduate Research Coordinator and Javits Fellow in Early American Studies.

Taught at the University of the West Indies, St. Augustine campus, this program will investigate the literary and cultural history of the Caribbean Islands. Topics of interest include colonization and decolonization, natural resources and environment, and traditional and contemporary forms of artistic expression. Students will also visit historical sites and experience contemporary life in the Caribbean through numerous excursions. Students will do some readings in advance of travel, keep journals of their experiences during the trip, and turn in a written assignment in the Fall 2015 semester.

Itinerary: June 2015

01 | Group departs together (optional) from the OKC airport with late arrival in Trinidad
02 | Class at University of the West Indies (UWI), Tunapuna tour & Malick Folk Dance
03 | Tour of the UWI campus and class
04 | Tour of Chaguanas Market, Lion House, sugar factory, two temples, museums
05 | Class at UWI with boat tour of Caroni Wetlands bird sanctuary
06 | Autistic Society volunteer activity with visit to Maracas Beach
07 | Independent Activities / Free Day
08 | Class at UWI with tour of Port of Spain (capital) and turtle watching
09 | Class at UWI
10 | Full day on Tobago, incl. glass-bottomed boat, Fort King George, and Bucco Reef
11 | Class at UWI
12 | Group departs together (optional) from the Trinidad airport with late arrival in OKC

Download the Scholar Abroad | Trinidad & Tobago Application/Info. Sheet
Deadline: Jan. 30, 2015

Arts & Sciences Undergraduate Three Minute Thesis Competition – Register by Feb. 2

The College of Arts and Sciences
Undergraduate Three Minute Thesis Competition

The College of Arts and Sciences Student Council is hosting a Three Minute Thesis Competition for undergraduate students, who will present their research while gaining confidence and practice in communicating their findings to a general audience.  The event is sponsored by ConocoPhillips and the Dean’s Excellence and Scholarship Fund.

Eligibility

The competition is open to all undergraduate students with majors in the College of Arts and Sciences.

Cash Prizes

Cash prizes will be awarded to first through fifth place finishers (ranging from $250 to $1,000).

Schedule

Preliminary competition rounds will be held on Tuesday, February 17 at 5:30 pm on the 3rd floor of the Classroom Building.  The final round will be held on Thursday, February 19 at 6:00 pm in 035 Murray Hall.

Participants must register by February 2.

For more information, contact: undergraduate3mt.okstateas@gmail.com

Introducing Abby Cain from Yukon, OK

Abby Cain was awarded a $1,000 scholarship and spot in the prestigious Freshman Research Scholars program at Oklahoma State University where, starting in the fall, she will engage in cutting-edge research in collaboration with pioneering faculty researchers.

College: Human SciencesIMG_2373
Major: Human Development and Family Science

What do you most anticipate about life at OSU?
I anticipate meeting new people and adapting to a new school environment.

Pluto . . . Planet or Plutoid?
Planet

What’s your favorite Dr. Seuss book?
Fox in Socks

If you could have one superpower, what would you want? Why?
I would want invisibility so I can be extra stealthy.

What’s your favorite midnight snack?
Ghirardelli brownies

What’s the best costume you’ve ever worn?
My “nerd day” costume in my freshman year of high school

If you had to live under the sea, which animal would you be? Why?
I would be a sea turtle, only because Crush was one of my favorite characters in Finding Nemo.

Star Wars, Star Trek, Stargate or Dancing with the Stars?
Dancing with the Stars

What do you hope to accomplish in FRS?
I hope to learn more about the process of research and specifically learn about the field I research in.

Reminder: The Deadline to Apply for a $1,000 Book Collecting Prize is Next Friday (Nov. 7)

THE PRIZE
The Book Collecting Essay Prize is awarded as a $1,000 scholarship (disbursed Spring 2015) and a two-year OSU Friends of the Library membership each to one undergraduate and one graduate student winner.

ABOUT
The 2nd Annual Scholar Development and Undergraduate Research Book Collecting Essay Prize is a scholarship competition that encourages students to think critically about relationships between and among books. The prize is also a unique opportunity to develop competitive personal essay writing and open-format interview skills.

ESSAY EVALUATION CRITERIA
The book collection described may be either real (in possession of the student) or proposed (not in possession of the student). Both types of collections are weighted equally by the prize selection panel. You may define and describe your collection according to any criteria from author(s) and time period(s) to geographic area(s) and genre(s) and so forth. Your essay must demonstrate creativity with regards to the criteria that bind together your collection. Essays must also demonstrate in error-free prose both unique insight and intelligence. No minimum or maximum number of books is required, nor is preference given to larger collections.

ELIGIBILITY
All current Oklahoma State University undergraduate and graduate students in any major are encouraged to apply.

DEADLINE
E-mail due by 5:00pm CST Friday, November 7, 2014.

CLICK HERE FOR MORE INFORMATION AND TO APPLY

Reminder: The Deadline to Apply for Scholar Abroad-Sydney, Australia is Next Monday

The Henry Bellmon Office of Scholar Development and Undergraduate Research invites applicants for the 2015 “Scholars Abroad” Program: Opera and the Outback (Sydney, Australia| March 14-22, 2015).

International experience gives students a global perspective and a competitive edge to win prestigious scholarships, secure prominent jobs, and gain admission to top graduate school programs.  OSU Scholar Abroad is expanding in 2015 and “Opera and the Outback” is the fourth of this new series of international programs.  Participants will attend thorough pre-departure travel orientations and be assigned texts to prepare for this experience.  Leading this program is OSU Associate Professor of Vocal Studies, Dr. Anne-Marie Condacse, in collaboration with Dr. Joshua Ward, OSU Director of Scholar Development and Undergraduate Research.

This program, which may also be eligible for Honors College “special experience” credit if arranged in advance, will investigate (a) the cultural framework of Australia’s music heritage and its role in the local community; (b) the backstage manpower and technology of the iconic Sydney Opera House and the commercial vitality of performing arts in Australia; (c) Australian indigenous performing arts heritage; and (d) the vast and mystifying Australian Outback.

This is a general education program that should be of interest to any OSU undergraduate who wants to work hard in this setting, accompanied by other OSU young scholars.  Ambitious and talented students interested in international experience including Australian opera, ballet, dance, and other performing arts, the performing arts as a community commodity and business, the Australian Outback and Aboriginal heritage, or history are welcomed and encouraged to apply.  The Office of Scholar Development and Undergraduate Research also invites students to visit (334 SU) for advice on writing their application essay or to answer any questions applicants might have.

Download the 2015 Scholar Abroad: Spring Break Application

Deadline: Nov. 3, 2014

Support Wentz Research Scholar Forrest Roger’s Investigation of “The Hormonal Love Story of Homosexual and Heterosexual Attraction”

Wentz Research Scholar Forrest Rogers is crowdfunding part of his research on “the hormonal love story of homosexual and heterosexual attraction” at experiment.com.  Click here for information about the project and how you can help answer the question “What is the science behind love and attraction?”

ATTENTION: If you are interested in becoming a Wentz Research Scholar like Forrest, you can apply for a $4,500 Wentz Research Grant or a $750 Wentz Semester Research Grant.  Click here for information about the Wentz Research Grants program.

Same Love: The Hormonal Love Story of Homosexual and Heterosexual Attraction

Context

Previous research suggests that there is a strong link between love, attraction, and hormones. The stress hormone, cortisol, plays a critical role in attraction. Some studies suggest that there is a synchronization of cortisol in romantic partners. Unfortunately, research is lacking information about attraction within the LGBTQ community. While previous studies have focused on heterosexual couples, they have failed to include homosexual couples.  Previous research has also failed to provide a description of our hormonal response to simply being exposed/presented to our significant other. That is, it is currently unclear as to what is actually happening in our bodies to make us feel the way we do when we see our significant other.

Implications

Research into the biological background of love helps us understand how we operate as couples. This information can help us understand how to strengthen our relationships. This study seeks to broaden our knowledge by expanding the research into the LGBTQ community, thus giving a bigger picture of the thing we call love. Research commonly ignores the LGBTQ community, simply because it is easier to study heterosexual couples. It is crucial that we study homosexual couples if we are to fully consider love and attraction. Our study also seeks to provide a more “real-time” description of how we respond to our romantic partners. This will give us a deeper understanding of the dynamics of the hormonal regulation of attraction.

Objectives

There are two primary goals of this study:

1. We hope to discover how individuals in a couple respond hormonally to one another. This can be accomplished by collecting saliva from individuals at and around a time at which they are presented to their romantic partner. We can take this saliva and analyze it for a stress hormone, cortisol, and an additional hormone, testosterone. These could give us great insight into why we experience what we do; that is, we’ll be looking at the chemicals that make you feel butterflies.

2. We also wish to collect information about social stressors and behavior via questionnaire. Questionnaires can give us greater insight into how individuals in couples are emotionally attached to one another and what kinds of social stress they experience together.

Same Love: The Hormonal Love Story of Homosexual and Heterosexual Attraction

Reminder: Goldwater, Udall & Truman Applications Due Friday (Oct. 31)

Oklahoma State University is allowed to nominate a limited number of students to compete for the following national scholarships.  To apply, please follow the directions on the institutional nomination information sheet.

Please visit the Scholar Development office (334 Student Union) and speak casually to Josh Ward or Tim O’Neil about your experiences, background, and potential suitability for these awards.  This may be very motivating or may save you some time.  To schedule an appointment, e-mail Cathy Lopez at schdev@okstate.edu.


HARRY S. TRUMAN SCHOLARSHIP
UP TO $30,000 FOR GRADUATE SCHOOL

Created by Congress for those who intend to pursue careers in public service, defined as “Employment in government at any level, uniformed services, public-interest organizations, nongovernmental research and/or educational organizations, public and private schools, and public service oriented non-profit organizations such as those whose primary purposes are to help needy or disadvantaged persons or to protect the environment.”

Eligibility:

  • You are/have:  One more year left of full-time undergraduate study after 2014-2015 academic year (usually that means you are junior), a U.S. citizen, at least a 3.6 GPA, and plans to attend graduate school.
  • You also have one or two passions relating to public service (as broadly defined above) where it is very clear that you have not only been actively involved in your passion but have truly become a champion for it at the local, state, national, or international level.

Visit www.truman.gov and read as much of the information as possible before applying.


BARRY M. GOLDWATER SCHOLARSHIP
UP TO $7,500 FOR UNDERGRADUATE EXPENSES

Created by Congress to honor Senator Barry M. Goldwater and to encourage excellence in the areas of science, engineering, or mathematics/computer science.

Eligibility:

  • You are/have:  One or two years left of full-time undergraduate study after the 2014-2015 academic year (usually that means you are a sophomore or junior), a U.S. citizen/perm. resident, at least a 3.8 GPA, and have plans to attend graduate school in the fields above (professional schools excluded).
  • You also have a very strong record of undergraduate research in one of the above fields as demonstrated by ongoing/completed projects, reports, presentations, publications, etc.

Visit goldwater.scholarsapply.org and read as much as possible before applying.


MORRIS K. AND STEWART L. UDALL SCHOLARSHIP
UP TO $5,000 FOR UNDERGRADUATE EXPENSES

Created by Congress to honor Congressman Morris K. Udall and later to include Stewart L. Udall and to award students with career aspirations related to the environment and sustainability.  The award is also available to Native American and Alaska Native students who intend to pursue careers in native health care or tribal public health policy.

Eligibility:

  • You are/have:  One or two years left of full-time undergraduate study after the 2014-2015 academic year (usually that means you are a sophomore or junior), a U.S. citizen/perm. resident, at least a 3.3 GPA, and have plans to attend graduate or professional school in the fields above.
  • You also have a very strong record of undergraduate research OR public service in one of the above fields as demonstrated by ongoing/completed projects, reports, presentations, publications, etc.

Visit www.udall.gov and read as much of the information as possible before applying.


SUBMIT ALL MATERIALS FOR INSTITUTIONAL NOMINATION BY
5:00pm October 31, 2014